10 Ways to be Eco-Friendly Around Your Home (Infographic)

10 ways to be eco-friendly around your home

With the world’s ever-growing awareness in sustainable living – it’s no doubt that its sparked a plethora of articles ascertaining how we should reduce our carbon foot-print and live a ‘green’ life. Generally speaking, it’s hard to invoke change without others seeing the benefit for themselves which is why some are reluctant to make even the smallest of changes, as some people believe their actions won’t really make much of a difference.

In this post we’ve put together 10 tips and some fascinating research to help you make small changes in your home and lifestyle. These small yet simple steps can make all the difference in reducing your carbon footprint, saving energy and most importantly – encouraging a green, eco-friendly lifestyle.

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1. Don't heat an empty house

By programming your thermostat to turning on when you wake up, get in from work or just before you go to bed are sure fire ways to cut down on your energy bills (anywhere between 5%-15% a year) and conserve energy that wouldn’t otherwise be made use of.

2. Turn off unused electronics at their source

Having your TV or desktop on standby unfortunately still conserves energy that you could, lets say, use to heat up your home (or save an additional £80 a year on your electricity bills).

3. Insulate your house by starting with your floors

Carpets and rugs are often favored over hard-wood floors in times of cold winters, especially as solid, exposed flooring aren’t very useful for insulating heat.  If you don’t want to sacrifice the look of your hardwood floors by installing a carpet then a simple rug can make all the difference in insulating heat in your home (and tie your interiors together for a uniform look).

4. Make room for natural light

Natural light not only looks aesthetically pleasing and offer an array of mental and physical benefits. But it also means you’ll be less likely to turn on unnecessary lighting in your home. 

5. Cook with residual heat

Residual heat keeps things cooking even when the oven is off. (also known as “carry-over-cooking”). It’s a common method for gentler cooking and equalizes temperature throughout your food. Little did we know that it’s actually perfect for reducing energy usage whilst still cooking your food perfectly.

6. Use "green upholstery"

Foam filled sofas contain toxic flame retardant chemicals which is a real cause of concern. Look for materials such as recycled polyester, organic wool and organic cotton fillings – all of which are safer materials for your home furnishing.

7. Go paperless with your billing

Going paperless can reduce the demand for paper production in the long run – not to mention digitized statements are easier to track and have no tendency of being misplaced. Paperless billing also means you’ll have less to process for your recycling bin, keeping you organised and clutter-free.

8. Change your electricity-powered lighting choices

Halogen incandexcents, Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) typically use anywhere between 25%-80% less energy than traditional household lightbulbs. They come in a wide range of colours and last significantly longer too – meaning less trips to buy new light bulbs and changing them altogether.

9. Install a low-flow toilet fixture

For low-impact living, a low-flow toilet is an obvious choice to reduce water consumption. It is averaged that a family of four could save anywhere up to 22,000 gallons of water per year by using a low-flow toilet. It’s both advantageous for water conservation and household energy bills.

10. Fill your loft and wall cavities

Cavity wall insulation  fills gaps found between external walls in homes, trapping the warmth in to save energy on electrical appliances to heat the home. We highly recommend looking for suppliers that have anti mold, rot, sag or decay insulators as to not cause any issues for the future.

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